22 Jan 2020

LFF 2019

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Fanny Lye Deliver’d

On a secluded farm in Shropshire, England in 1657 lives the Lye family: wife Fanny (Maxime Peake), her husband John (Charles Dance) and son Arthur. They live a spartan, quiet, puritanical life. John is the unquestioned patriarch of the house and rules the farm with…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Babyteeth

The heart-wrenching juxtaposition of the early embers of young love, as you look to navigate feelings that have been up to now, been quite alien to you. With the potential finality that could strike with a debilitating illness, clinging to those shreds of positivity as…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Monsoon

In his magnetic feature-length debut ‘Lilting’, director Hong Khaou keenly observed a mother and her deceased son’s boyfriend as they poignantly tried to overcome the language barrier, to find a commonality in their respective grief. Now he looks to deploy a similar delicacy and quiet…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Downton Abbey (2019)

Downton Abbey may not have the stakes one normally expects from a major motion picture, but it’s confident in the knowledge that all audiences really want is the comfort of something warm and familiar. And in that regard, it unequivocally succeeds, the establishing shots of…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood

A dearly beloved children’s television host whose mild-mannered nature along with his wonderful wisdom charmed many an American. Yet the reputation built and his lasting impact perhaps didn’t quite translate to our shores until Morgan Neville’s well-received award-winning documentary ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ last…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Portrait of a Lady on Fire (London Film Festival 2019)

‘I’ve dreamt of that for years. Dying? Running.’ The heart-stopping meet cute shared by Noemie Merlant’s blossoming painter Marianne and Adele Haenel’s reluctant bride-to-be Heloise on the edge of the cliff, whose longing stares into the wide crystal blue waters epitomise the isolation felt and…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Vivarium

From the moment that Vivarium’s opening bright red credits flash onto the screen à la Michael Haneke’s Funny Games, you know you’re in for a wild, unpredictable ride. When young couple Tom (Jesse Eisenberg) and Gemma (Imogen Poots) arrive at an estate agency looking to…

Film Reviews, Latest, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Irishman

It is hard to put into words just what Martin Scorsese means to me as a film fan, as I’m sure everybody reading this could attest to. His influence on cinema, filmmaking, and pop culture is absolutely unparalleled; come on, I even named my pet…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Pink Wall

“As a whole, for a directorial debut, it’s quite brilliant how assured this film is by Tom Cullen” Rating: ★★★★½ Directed by: Tom Cullen Written by: Tom Cullen Cast: Tatiana Maslany, Jay Duplass, Sarah Ovens Release Date: 15th November 2019

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Report

In December 2014, 525 pages of a 6,725-page report on the CIA’s post-9/11 use of torture on terror suspects were released. The rest of the original, unredacted report remains classified, but Scott Z. Burns’ political docudrama The Report sheds light on the investigation, spearheaded by…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Uncut Gems (London Film Festival 2019)

The Safdie Brothers (Josh and Benny) made their mark in 2017 with the excellent Good Time. With a fantastic performance from Robert Pattinson, this taut thriller expertly demonstrated the brothers ability to create tension, and if your nerves weren’t shredded enough then, just you wait…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The House of Us

Taking elements of Hirokazu Kore-eda’s explorations of family units, and the vivid, childlike lens of Sean Baker’s The Florida Project, Ga-eun Yoon’s film about three girls who make a family of their own is a heart-warming and gorgeous depiction of childhood that is impossible not…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Jojo Rabbit

Right from the start, Jojo Rabbit had critics and the audience divided. Premiering at the Toronto film festival it was received with both praise and criticism mainly because of its portrayal of Nazis. Packed with a star-filled cast who all received praise helped it win the People’s Choice…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Rare Beasts

Acclaimed actress Billie Piper makes her directorial and screenwriting debut with Rare Beasts, which has been pitched as a sort of ‘anti rom-com’. Piper also stars in the film as Mandy, a single mother who works for a production company, while trying to find someone…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Knives Out (London Film Festival 2019)

Opting for such a sharp, clinical title, you’d be forgiven in thinking Rian Johnson is looking to make an eagerly awaited cinematic ‘comeback’, to all the exhausting bordering on volatile discussions stirred up from his divisive efforts on Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Away from…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Matthias And Maxime

Hardly clowning around in the deeply scarring opening sequence of horror sequel It: Chapter Two earlier this year, the talents of Xavier Dolan have slowly started to filter into the mainstream. Since stealing this reviewer’s heart with the magnificence that was Mommy, many have implied…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Last Black Man in San Francisco

There is something so quietly captivating about ‘The Last Black Man in San Francisco’ that it is hard to put your finger on. From the opening frame to the last, I found myself completely enthralled by this poetic story about belonging, change, identity and friendship,…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Bad Education

After thoroughly impressing with debut feature Thoroughbreds (which in fact played at the London Film Festival in 2017), director Cory Finley is back with his sophomore effort Bad Education. Based on the shocking true story of the single largest public school embezzlement scandal in history,…

Film Reviews, Latest, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Marriage Story

As a huge fan of Baumbach’s The Squid and the Whale, I was very much looking forward to see him tackling the difficult theme of divorce once again, and Marriage Story absolutely did not disappoint. This is arguably Baumbach’s most accomplished directorial offering, and there’s…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: The Lighthouse (London Film Festival 2019)

After exploding onto the horror scene with his nightmarish folk fable The Witch, all eyes were on what director Robert Eggers would do next. His sophomore offering The Lighthouse is a maniacal maritime fever dream, which pairs robust filmmaking and gorgeous black and white cinematography…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Hope Gap

  “A couple’s visit with their son takes a dramatic turn when the father tells him he plans on leaving his mother.”   Rating: ★★★½   Directed by: William Nicholson Written by: William Nicholson Cast: Annette Bening, Bill Nighy, Josh O’Connor Release Date: TBA

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Personal History of David Copperfield

From poking fun at Soviet Russia in The Death Of Stalin, to arming Peter Capaldi’s director of communications with delicious verbal zingers in The Thick Of It and In The Loop. In this rather turbulent and somewhat horrific modern political landscape where the fat cats…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Sid & Judy

With Renee Zelwegger biopic Judy now also in cinemas, the arrival of this documentary certainly feels timely. Offering a more private, heartfelt, and honest depiction of the legendary singer, Sid & Judy is a personal and revealing snapshot of Judy Garland, told mostly from the…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Monos

When you think commandos, your mind is likely to hark back to the muscle-bound machismo of the 1980’s, heavily featuring one Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime. You would hardly envisage a free-spirited group of tearaway teenagers wielding guns. Yet deep in the Colombian mountains, ‘Monos’…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Peanut Butter Falcon

Right from the get go The Peanut Butter Falcon will be a hard sell. Not because of the film itself or that it stars Shia LeBeouf and Dakota Johnson, but because of the name itself. Who really wants to see a film called ‘The Peanut…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Animated Shorts Reviews

    Kanini & Kanino by Hiromasa Yonebayashi Anything from Studio Ponoc (the off-shoot from Studio Ghibli) is immediately going to pique my interest, so of course I was delighted to see this short included on the LFF programme. As one would expect, the animation…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Little Monsters

“Just another throwaway addition to the zom-rom-com genre. Considering the talent involved, it’s very middle of the road” My Rating: ★★★ Directed by: Abe Forsythe Written by: Abe Forsythe Cast: Lupita Nyong’o, Josh Gad, Alexander England, Stephen Peacocke Release Date: 12th November 2019

LFF 2019

Hidden Gems Screening at 2019’s London Film Festival

After the big programme announcement on the 29th August, the hype for 2019’s BFI London Film Festival truly began, and the programme is certainly packed with some amazing films this year. Whilst the big draws such as The Irishman, Jojo Rabbit, The Lighthouse and Knives…

LFF 2018 Reviews

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Fanny Lye Deliver’d

On a secluded farm in Shropshire, England in 1657 lives the Lye family: wife Fanny (Maxime Peake), her husband John (Charles Dance) and son Arthur. They live a spartan, quiet, puritanical life. John is the unquestioned patriarch of the house and rules the farm with…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Babyteeth

The heart-wrenching juxtaposition of the early embers of young love, as you look to navigate feelings that have been up to now, been quite alien to you. With the potential finality that could strike with a debilitating illness, clinging to those shreds of positivity as…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Monsoon

In his magnetic feature-length debut ‘Lilting’, director Hong Khaou keenly observed a mother and her deceased son’s boyfriend as they poignantly tried to overcome the language barrier, to find a commonality in their respective grief. Now he looks to deploy a similar delicacy and quiet…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Downton Abbey (2019)

Downton Abbey may not have the stakes one normally expects from a major motion picture, but it’s confident in the knowledge that all audiences really want is the comfort of something warm and familiar. And in that regard, it unequivocally succeeds, the establishing shots of…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: A Beautiful Day in the Neighbourhood

A dearly beloved children’s television host whose mild-mannered nature along with his wonderful wisdom charmed many an American. Yet the reputation built and his lasting impact perhaps didn’t quite translate to our shores until Morgan Neville’s well-received award-winning documentary ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ last…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Portrait of a Lady on Fire (London Film Festival 2019)

‘I’ve dreamt of that for years. Dying? Running.’ The heart-stopping meet cute shared by Noemie Merlant’s blossoming painter Marianne and Adele Haenel’s reluctant bride-to-be Heloise on the edge of the cliff, whose longing stares into the wide crystal blue waters epitomise the isolation felt and…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Vivarium

From the moment that Vivarium’s opening bright red credits flash onto the screen à la Michael Haneke’s Funny Games, you know you’re in for a wild, unpredictable ride. When young couple Tom (Jesse Eisenberg) and Gemma (Imogen Poots) arrive at an estate agency looking to…

Film Reviews, Latest, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Irishman

It is hard to put into words just what Martin Scorsese means to me as a film fan, as I’m sure everybody reading this could attest to. His influence on cinema, filmmaking, and pop culture is absolutely unparalleled; come on, I even named my pet…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Pink Wall

“As a whole, for a directorial debut, it’s quite brilliant how assured this film is by Tom Cullen” Rating: ★★★★½ Directed by: Tom Cullen Written by: Tom Cullen Cast: Tatiana Maslany, Jay Duplass, Sarah Ovens Release Date: 15th November 2019

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Report

In December 2014, 525 pages of a 6,725-page report on the CIA’s post-9/11 use of torture on terror suspects were released. The rest of the original, unredacted report remains classified, but Scott Z. Burns’ political docudrama The Report sheds light on the investigation, spearheaded by…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Uncut Gems (London Film Festival 2019)

The Safdie Brothers (Josh and Benny) made their mark in 2017 with the excellent Good Time. With a fantastic performance from Robert Pattinson, this taut thriller expertly demonstrated the brothers ability to create tension, and if your nerves weren’t shredded enough then, just you wait…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The House of Us

Taking elements of Hirokazu Kore-eda’s explorations of family units, and the vivid, childlike lens of Sean Baker’s The Florida Project, Ga-eun Yoon’s film about three girls who make a family of their own is a heart-warming and gorgeous depiction of childhood that is impossible not…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Jojo Rabbit

Right from the start, Jojo Rabbit had critics and the audience divided. Premiering at the Toronto film festival it was received with both praise and criticism mainly because of its portrayal of Nazis. Packed with a star-filled cast who all received praise helped it win the People’s Choice…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Rare Beasts

Acclaimed actress Billie Piper makes her directorial and screenwriting debut with Rare Beasts, which has been pitched as a sort of ‘anti rom-com’. Piper also stars in the film as Mandy, a single mother who works for a production company, while trying to find someone…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: Knives Out (London Film Festival 2019)

Opting for such a sharp, clinical title, you’d be forgiven in thinking Rian Johnson is looking to make an eagerly awaited cinematic ‘comeback’, to all the exhausting bordering on volatile discussions stirred up from his divisive efforts on Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Away from…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Matthias And Maxime

Hardly clowning around in the deeply scarring opening sequence of horror sequel It: Chapter Two earlier this year, the talents of Xavier Dolan have slowly started to filter into the mainstream. Since stealing this reviewer’s heart with the magnificence that was Mommy, many have implied…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Last Black Man in San Francisco

There is something so quietly captivating about ‘The Last Black Man in San Francisco’ that it is hard to put your finger on. From the opening frame to the last, I found myself completely enthralled by this poetic story about belonging, change, identity and friendship,…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Bad Education

After thoroughly impressing with debut feature Thoroughbreds (which in fact played at the London Film Festival in 2017), director Cory Finley is back with his sophomore effort Bad Education. Based on the shocking true story of the single largest public school embezzlement scandal in history,…

Film Reviews, Latest, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Marriage Story

As a huge fan of Baumbach’s The Squid and the Whale, I was very much looking forward to see him tackling the difficult theme of divorce once again, and Marriage Story absolutely did not disappoint. This is arguably Baumbach’s most accomplished directorial offering, and there’s…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

REVIEW: The Lighthouse (London Film Festival 2019)

After exploding onto the horror scene with his nightmarish folk fable The Witch, all eyes were on what director Robert Eggers would do next. His sophomore offering The Lighthouse is a maniacal maritime fever dream, which pairs robust filmmaking and gorgeous black and white cinematography…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Hope Gap

  “A couple’s visit with their son takes a dramatic turn when the father tells him he plans on leaving his mother.”   Rating: ★★★½   Directed by: William Nicholson Written by: William Nicholson Cast: Annette Bening, Bill Nighy, Josh O’Connor Release Date: TBA

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Personal History of David Copperfield

From poking fun at Soviet Russia in The Death Of Stalin, to arming Peter Capaldi’s director of communications with delicious verbal zingers in The Thick Of It and In The Loop. In this rather turbulent and somewhat horrific modern political landscape where the fat cats…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Sid & Judy

With Renee Zelwegger biopic Judy now also in cinemas, the arrival of this documentary certainly feels timely. Offering a more private, heartfelt, and honest depiction of the legendary singer, Sid & Judy is a personal and revealing snapshot of Judy Garland, told mostly from the…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Monos

When you think commandos, your mind is likely to hark back to the muscle-bound machismo of the 1980’s, heavily featuring one Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime. You would hardly envisage a free-spirited group of tearaway teenagers wielding guns. Yet deep in the Colombian mountains, ‘Monos’…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: The Peanut Butter Falcon

Right from the get go The Peanut Butter Falcon will be a hard sell. Not because of the film itself or that it stars Shia LeBeouf and Dakota Johnson, but because of the name itself. Who really wants to see a film called ‘The Peanut…

LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Animated Shorts Reviews

    Kanini & Kanino by Hiromasa Yonebayashi Anything from Studio Ponoc (the off-shoot from Studio Ghibli) is immediately going to pique my interest, so of course I was delighted to see this short included on the LFF programme. As one would expect, the animation…

Film Reviews, LFF 2019

LFF 2019: Little Monsters

“Just another throwaway addition to the zom-rom-com genre. Considering the talent involved, it’s very middle of the road” My Rating: ★★★ Directed by: Abe Forsythe Written by: Abe Forsythe Cast: Lupita Nyong’o, Josh Gad, Alexander England, Stephen Peacocke Release Date: 12th November 2019

LFF 2019

Hidden Gems Screening at 2019’s London Film Festival

After the big programme announcement on the 29th August, the hype for 2019’s BFI London Film Festival truly began, and the programme is certainly packed with some amazing films this year. Whilst the big draws such as The Irishman, Jojo Rabbit, The Lighthouse and Knives…

3.0
Events, Film Reviews, Films, London Film Festival, London Short Film Festival, Z - 2018

LFF 2018: A Private War (2018)

War, what is it good for? After watching documentary filmmaker Mathew Heineman’s narrative debut the answer is clearly absolutely nothing. A Private War is a biopic which follows war correspondent Marie Colvin through her stellar career. The true horrors of war are never an easy…

4.0
Events, Film Reviews, Films, London Film Festival

LFF 2018: Stan & Ollie

Back in 1937 Laurel and Hardy were at the peak of their powers but their friendship was starting to creek. Strangely Stan Laurel was out of contact with the studio. He wanted a new and better deal. Oliver Hardy was still under contract and seemed to be happy with his current…

4.5
Events, Film Reviews, Films, London Film Festival, Z - 2018

LFF 2018: The Old Man and The Gun

A legend of cinema since the mid-1960s, Robert Redford has certainly had an illustrious career. Now some 50+ films later, Redford tips a cap to his own career and gracefully retires from acting in the delightful throwback film The Old Man and The Gun. The…

3.5
Events, Film Reviews, Films, London Film Festival, Z - 2018

LFF 2018: Outlaw King

I was once told if you go into a film expecting the worst, you will never leave disappointed. There is some truth in that. Early talk on Outlaw King suggested that it is the film that Chris Pine gets his cock out. Well, that is…